How pandemic bento boxes became care packages and a new business model

Growing up outside of Tokyo, Chef Kenji Miyaishi’s mother used to send him off with bento boxes of onigiri rice balls, karaage fried chicken, tamago-yaki egg omelets and vegetables from her garden.

Now, as he’s pivoted his upscale restaurant in Napa, California, to prepare and deliver bento boxes amid the pandemic, he says he aims to serve with the same values of precision, culture and care his mother did.

Chef Kenji Miayishi. Credit Bob McClenahan (Bob McClenahan)
Chef Kenji Miayishi. Credit Bob McClenahan (Bob McClenahan)

Bento boxes can be traced back to the Kamakura period in 12th century Japan, and this year — with restaurants relying on takeout and delivery — they’ve become a relevant and culturally authentic way for kaiseki chefs across the country to stay in business.

And some chefs say, at a time of uncertainty, the boxes have also come to symbolize nurturing and comfort.

“Bento is usually made by a mother for her children

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lockdown: Business travel picks up in India for first time since lockdown

Few key executives and engineers of Skoda Auto Volkswagen India have travelled in the last six months to revamp its factory, sales and service outlets.

Synopsis

Top corporates such as Maruti Suzuki, Hyundai, Mercedes Benz, ITC, Parle Products, Vivo, Oppo, Lenovo, Mondelez, and Panasonic have given some relaxation to travel restrictions for critical work and projects which cannot be completed through video-conferencing.

Kolkata/Mumbai: Business travel has picked up in India for the first time since the lockdown with several top corporates allowing employees, including chief executives, business heads and even mid-level managers, to travel in both domestic and international routes.Top corporates such as Maruti Suzuki, Hyundai, Mercedes Benz, ITC, Parle Products, Vivo, Oppo, Lenovo, Mondelez, and Panasonic have given some relaxation to travel restrictions for

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Life Upended: Owner of tour guide business left with no income

Life Upended. The coronavirus outbreak has had a devastating impact on our nation, and it has touched Staten Islanders in countless ways. In this series, reporter Tracey Porpora will share the stories of those who have been thrust into situations that were unimaginable just a few months ago — those who have seen their life completely upended. This is the nineteenth story of “Life Upended.

STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. — Heather Pastore, 45, owner of the Castleton Corners-based Manhattan Greeterz Walking Tours, found success offering unique excursions of Manhattan skyscrapers and monuments over the last five years.

Two of her most requested tours were of Manhattan’s Grand Central Terminal, where she would reveal the transportation hub’s nine “secrets,” and a “9/11 downtown tour.”

In addition to her tourism company, Pastore, a Castleton Corners resident, had a successful private tutoring business for 25 years where she would give students private

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Business trip during pandemic: testing, empty airports, lonely takeout

  • Alan Kearl is a beauty industry executive experienced in operations, finance, and strategy.
  • After losing his job during the pandemic, he was sheltering in place in Maine.
  • So he had mixed emotions when he was offered a consulting gig that would require travel.
  • Overall, he’s felt safe traveling, but has noticed a lot of big changes in airports and hotels.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

As a C-level executive in the beauty industry, having worked for companies like Estée Lauder and tarte, I normally travel over 100,000 miles and spend more than 35 nights in hotels annually. 

But, since the start of the pandemic, I lost my job and have been sheltering in place. While I craved a return to my normal routine, I wasn’t keen to dramatically increase my exposure to COVID-19. So it was with mixed emotions that I accepted a consulting gig that would require

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Travel mag readers give Hyatt high rank | Business

CAMBRIDGE — Readers of the Condé Nast Traveler magazine gave the Hyatt Regency Chesapeake Bay in Cambridge a high ranking in a recent list of the top 20 resorts in the south.

Condé Nast Traveler announced the results of its annual Readers’ Choice Awards, with Hyatt Regency Chesapeake Bay Golf Resort, Spa and Marina recognized as the second highest ranked resort in the South, after more than 715,000 readers submitted ratings for their travel experiences across the globe.

“We are thrilled to be recognized with such a prestigious accolade as Condé Nast Traveler’s Readers’ Choice Awards,” said Hyatt Regency Chesapeake Bay General Manager Joel Bunde. “Our team is dedicated to caring for others so they can be their best and we strive daily to provide unforgettable and meaningful experiences that our guests will cherish for years to come. We are honored by this recognition as it is a testament to

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Rising coronavirus cases in El Paso County could impact business reopenings

Editor’s Note: This story has been updated after initial publication to include information about Gov. Greg Abbott permitting bars to reopen and remarks from city and county leaders. 

El Paso nurse talks about new normal during the coronavirus pandemic

UP NEXT

UP NEXT

When Gov. Greg Abbott relaxed how many people can dine at restaurants and occupy other businesses in El Paso and across Texas, there was a condition: Coronavirus hospitalizations must stay low. 

Abbott let restaurants, retail stores, office buildings, manufacturing facilities, gyms, museums and libraries increase their capacity from 50% to 75% on Sept. 21.

On Wednesday, Abbott said other businesses limited to 50% capacity, such as movie theaters and bowling alleys, could expand capacity to 75% on Oct. 14. He also permitted bars in the state to open at up to 50% capacity with county judge approval.

But the order only applies to regions without

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Airlines, Hotels, Workspaces Get Creative in Effort to Buoy Business Travel

As the global aviation industry begins to take flight again, U.S. airlines are starting to get creative about keeping their most valuable flyers: business travelers.

U.S. airlines, on average, are looking to replace roughly 86.5% of their revenue from 2019. United Airlines’ revenue is down 85% so far this year.

Now, United, the nation’s third-largest carrier, is partnering with meeting and event space company Peerspace, to bundle flights alongside office space. The airline is homing in on professionals whose jobs are again requiring long-distance travel.

“We’re an airline; we’re not in the office space business or the meeting space business. But how can we solve that problem of having people come together safely?” said BJ Youngerman, who leads United’s California market strategy. “Regardless of where someone may be living on a temporary or permanent basis, we have the ability to bring people together.”

Peerspace’s platform touts nearly 20,000 spaces in

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Carnival Corporation & plc Provides a Business Update

MIAMI, Oct. 8, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Carnival Corporation & plc (NYSE/LSE: CCL; NYSE: CUK) provides a business update.

Carnival Corporation & plc President and Chief Executive Officer Arnold Donald noted, “We have come full circle from initiating a suspension in the early days of the pandemic, to transitioning the fleet into a pause status, right sizing our organization and, now, embarking on the phased resumption of guest operations, underway in two of our world leading cruise brands, Costa in Italy and AIDA in Germany. We have accelerated the sale of less efficient ships, enabling us to capitalize on pent up demand on reduced capacity and structurally lower our cost base, while retaining our most cash generating assets. We are taking aggressive actions managing the balance sheet and reducing capacity to position us to weather this disruption and also emerge a leaner, more efficient company, reinforcing our industry leading

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Live-streaming here to stay as Chinese travel business almost ‘fully recovers’ from Covid-19, Trip.com co-founder says



James Liang wearing a suit and tie: James Liang Jianzhang, co-founder and executive chairman of Trip.com Group. Photo: Handout


James Liang Jianzhang, co-founder and executive chairman of Trip.com Group. Photo: Handout

When China’s coronavirus cases stabilised in March and domestic tourism began to resume, Trip.com Group’s co-founder and executive chairman James Liang Jianzhang traded his formal business attire for ancient Chinese clothing, known as hanfu, to host live-streamed shows selling travel packages and hotel room bookings.

Liang’s entertaining video campaigns, incorporating traditional Chinese performance arts such as crosstalk and Sichuan “face-changing” opera, have made him an internet celebrity.

His 25 live streams on various platforms have netted Trip.com Group – China’s biggest online travel services provider – over 2 billion yuan (US$294 million), according to the Shanghai-based company formerly known as Ctrip.com. Most of the orders were for presale deals, where customers purchase travel packages or bookings in advance to be redeemed at a later date.

Get the latest insights and analysis from our Global Impact newsletter on the

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Business Travel Demand Won’t Bounce Back In 2021, And Maybe Not For Years

Even if a vaccine for Covid-19 becomes widely available – and widely used – around the globe, and if the very onerous government restrictions on international travel largely disappear, airlines still will continue to struggle with extraordinarily weak demand for business travel through end of 2021, and likely beyond.

And that could be devastating for already cash-depleted airlines that are guaranteed this year to report losses that, even for an industry with a long history of red ink, will be record-shattering.

The economic importance of business travel for all conventional airlines and even for most so-called

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