Trump turned his hotels, resorts into ‘Beltway’s new back rooms’: New York Times

The New York Times has released a report, the fourth in its series, based on President Donald Trump’s federal tax returns, illustrating how the paper says the president turned “his own hotels and resorts into the Beltway’s new back rooms, where public and private business mix and special interests reign.”



Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: President Donald Trump walks to the White House residence after exiting Marine One on the South Lawn on June 25, 2020, in Washington.


© Drew Angerer/Getty Images, FILE
President Donald Trump walks to the White House residence after exiting Marine One on the South Lawn on June 25, 2020, in Washington.

Trump attended 34 political fundraisers at his hotels and resorts that brought in $3 million in revenue, the Times reported.

“Sometimes he lined up his donors to ask what they needed from the government,” the Times said.

Brian Ballard, a Florida lobbyist and confidant of the president, joined Trump’s Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida midway through Trump’s presidency, the paper reported. Associates later said he did this because the president wanted him to

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Trump turned his hotels, resorts into ‘Beltway’s new back rooms,’ New York Times reports

Trump attended 34 political fundraisers at his hotels and resorts that brought in $3 million in revenue, the Times reported.

“Sometimes he lined up his donors to ask what they needed from the government,” the Times said.

Brian Ballard, a Florida lobbyist and confidant of the president, joined Trump’s Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida midway through Trump’s presidency, the paper reported. Associates later said he did this because the president wanted him to “ante up,” the Times said.

Ballard dismissed any accusations questioning his membership at Mar-a-Lago, the Times reported, and called the idea, in part, “ridiculous.”

PHOTO: President Donald Trump walks to the White House residence after exiting Marine One on the South Lawn on June 25, 2020, in Washington.

President Donald Trump walks

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Anger as Turkish army reopens Cyprus resort turned ghost town

Turkish troops Thursday reopened parts of a Cyprus seaside resort that became a ghost town amid war in 1974, sparking controversy days ahead of an election in the breakaway Turkish north.

The move at Varosha threatened to further inflame tensions in the eastern Mediterranean, where Turkey has been engaged in bitter maritime disputes with Greece and Cyprus.

President Nicos Anastasiades of the Greek-majority south denounced a “flagrant violation of international law and the resolutions of the UN Security Council” while his country’s close ally Greece warned it would raise the issue with EU partners.

As the gates were opened for the first time in decades, with troops guarding the site, visitors streamed in taking smartphone pictures of a city seemingly frozen in time, with trees and bushes growing from abandoned cafes, shops and houses.

A seaside suburb of the historic city of Famagusta, Varosha was Cyprus’s premier resort in its

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How Two Friends Turned the History of the ‘Green Book’ Into a Podcast

Most Black travelers in America know the Green Book, a travel guide published from 1937 to 1966, by name and by heart. For decades its existence distilled a sense of safety, certainty, and preparation for Black people who took to the highways and byways of this vast country. And its important legacy is something Alvin Hall, a BBC broadcaster who has reported extensively on the Green Book in the past, and Janée Woods Weber, an activist and social justice educator, wanted to explore in a new podcast from Macmillan.

To produce Driving the Green Book, last summer Hall and Woods Weber embarked on a 12-day multi-city exploration of hotels and businesses featured in the Green Book. The pair, who have been friends for years, started their journey in Detroit and ultimately ended up in New Orleans.

Along the way their interviewees shared revealing and often painful stories

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Luxury cars, MAGA flags and Facebook invites: How an unknown Idaho family organized the Portland rally that turned deadly

Kyzik was not well known in Republican activist circles. In fact, Kyzik was not even his real name, according to a review of business and academic records, as well as interviews with family members.

He is Alex Kuzmenko, a 33-year-old architect who lives in a second-story apartment in Meridian, a bedroom community outside the majority-Democratic city of Boise. His YouTube channel featured luxury car reviews before shifting to pro-Trump memes and videos several months ago. He and members of his family — immigrants from Belarus and Ukraine ­— had almost no political profile before organizing one of the most consequential pro-Trump demonstrations of the summer.

The shooting of Aaron “Jay” Danielson, 39, a supporter of the far-right group Patriot Prayer and a participant in the cruise rally, became a bloody bookend to an anguished summer in Portland and other communities. The alleged assailant, a self-described adherent of antifascism, or antifa,

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